Cessnock

Cessnock
Architecture: Walmer Crescent

During the 1970’s redevelopment of the subway many of the stations were given new, stand-alone homes; a move away from accessing the platform through the ground floor of a tenement building.

Cessnock is one of the only stations to remain in its original place under a tenement and this is largely due to the importance of the building. Walmer Crescent [12], built in 1857 by Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson, stands above the station and is a celebrated work from one of Glasgow’s most renowned and respected architects. Thomson preceded and inspired Charles Rennie Mackintosh with an approach that merged historical styles and ideas (most notably Greek) within a Victorian Glasgow. He mastered this hybrid style in his order, proportion and detailing. This building is one of his simplest and most minimal being largely free of ornate stonework and frivolous details although it can also be seen as one of the most ‘Glaswegian’ examples of his work. It is solid, robust and square while the crescent shape invites and welcomes you. The strong horizontal elements, consistent with the Glasgow tenement typology, are celebrated in moves like the continuous band forming a lintel over ground floor windows while the details such as the colonnade of square columns at the top floor, the recessed mortar joints and the variety of stone course heights make this an extra special example of a Glasgow tenement.